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Maths this week

21/5/17

This week we are looking at

Recognising, finding and naming a half as one of two equal parts of an object, shape or quantity.

 

It important that children first recognise the concept of a 'whole' and that halving is sharing/dividing a whole into 2 equal parts.

 

Strategies to support your child may include:

*Making shapes and folding them into 2 equal parts

*Sharing amounts of coins between 2

*Using templates like to 10 frame or 20 frame, looking at the many different ways of shading a half.

*Filling and halving containers, using water or sand.

*Sharing objects/amounts into 2 sets, saying '1 for you and one for me'.

 

7/5/17

This week we are looking at

Solving one step problems involving multiplication and division, by calculating the answer using concrete objects, pictorial representations and arrays with the support of the teacher.

 

Strategies to support your child may include:

Words problems. For example, 

Kayleigh has 30 flowers to share between 3 vases equally. How many flowers can be put in each vase?

 

Here is an array.

cheeky cheeky cheeky cheeky

cheeky cheeky cheeky cheeky

 

Mandy says, “I can find four facts from this.” Do you agree? Convince me!

 

  • How many equal cubes can you make using 10 cubes? 12 cubes? 16 cubes?

 

2/5/17

This week we are looking at

Count in multiples of twos, fives and tens.

 

Strategies to support your child may include:

Counting, using the 100 square to scaffold.

For 2's, practical activities may include: Counting and pairing socks or shoes.

2p pieces or towers of 2.

 

Using language such as 'multiples' eg. What are the first 6 multiple of 2?

Observing formal written methods such as: 5x10=

 

Mastery will include looking at other ways to make a multiple. For example:

  • If you know the following information

 

2 x 4 = 8

5 x 6 = 30

7 x 10 = 70

 

What other facts do you know? You can use addition, subtraction and multiplication.

 

 

24/4/17

This week we are looking at

Compare, describe and solve practical problems for lengths and heights (for example, long/short, longer/shorter, tall/short, double/half )

Measure and begin to record lengths and heights.

 

Strategies to support your child may include:

 

  • Outside collect sticks and place them in order. Use sentences such as This stick is the

shortest. This stick is long but that one is longer etc.

 

  • Use a large stick from outside- preferably one that is 1 metre long. Stick masking tape at 10cm intervals (discretely). The children are to use this stick to find items that are longer, shorter, double, half and the same size.  

 

  • Pick up your book. Find 5 items in the room that are shorter than it and 5 items that are longer. Record them in sentences.

 

A red brick is double the size of a blue brick.

Which is longer?

2 red bricks or 4 blue bricks?

3 red bricks or 7 blue bricks? (provide the children with bricks or strips of paper to help them reason with this)

 

How many ways can you find to put the bricks together so they are equal sizes? Do you notice a pattern?

 

  • Give the children different sized pieces of string. How many ways can you measure the pieces of string? You could use; cubes, a ruler, marbles, your fingertips etc.

 

 

 

 

18/4/17

This week we are looking at 

Solving one step problems that involve addition and subtraction and using concrete objects and pictorial representations and missing number problems.

 

Strategies to support you child will include practising with lots of simple problems, so children can start to reason, use and apply strategies learned previously. Concrete pictures or resources to work out problems such as counters,  numberlines or hundred squares may help. Paper and pencil to promote drawings is also beneficial. Trying to see the correlation between addition, subtraction or missing number in a calculation may also be beneficial.

Some examples of questions asked this week are as follows:

 

I have 7 more sweets than Olivia. How many sweets must I give Olivia so that we have the same number of sweets? Explain how you know.

 

There are 15 people on the bus. At one stop 7 people get off. How many people are left on the bus?

 

The bus can hold 20 people. How many spare seats does it have?

 

 

 

At a park there are 37 wheels. There are some scooters with 2 wheels and some scooters with 2 wheels. How many 2 wheel and 3 wheel scooters could there be? Find two ways to do it.

 

 

 

 

 

 

20/3/17

This week, we are still looking at Number.

Read, write and interpret mathematical statements involving addition (+), subtraction (-) and equals (=) signs. 

 

Strategies to support your child may include:

Examples to reason:- 

Eg.

The following numbers are given to two children.

14, 6, 20

Harjas says, “I will use an addition sign

for this calculation.”

Kaemon says, “This will need a subtraction sign.”

Who is right? Explain why.

 

Explain what the missing numbers or symbols are and how you know. If need

to, draw a picture to help you

 

1__ + 33 = 45

15 __ 17 = 32

17 - __ = 9

24 __ = 12

 

Examples for Mastery:-

Eg:

 

Using the numbers 1-40, how many calculations can you create? Have you used a strategy? n/ y

 

Using dominoes, make numbers less than 40. How many calculations can you create?

 

 

 Using the buckets, find different ways to make 30, 23, 35. You can use the numbers more than once.

1 21 9 29 13

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

28/2/17

This week, we are continuing to look at Number.

Given a number, identify 1 more or 1 less.

 

Strategies to support your child may include:

Examples to reason:-

Eg.

Calvin is finding 1 more and 1 less of a number. Here are some numbers he has found:
21,22,23 34,35,36 17,18,19

Calvin says, “No matter what number I pick the tens will stay the same. It is only the ones that change.”
Is he right? Explain why.

 

Or Problem-Solving:-

Eg:

A bag is full of digit cards from 1 - 40. Michelle pulls out a card and says “The difference between the digits is 1.” What card could she have pulled out? Is this the only option?

 

Here's a nice practical activity:-

In pairs, take it in turns to build a tower. Your partner needs to make 2 towers. The first will be 1 more than the original; the second will be 1 less.

 

 

This week, we are looking at Number.

To identify and represent numbers using objects and pictorial representations.

 

Strategies to support your child, may include:

Playing games, such as bingo with numbers up to and including 40.

Also the 'Number Game' where 2 players call out 1,2, or 3 consecutive numbers and the person who says 40 is the winner. 

Writing number stories which use pictures as well as numbers.

Example 1:     Start: 25       Change:  -3        End: 22

Tony and Ranjeet have 25 buns to sell. They sell 3. They now have a total of 23.

 

Example 2:      Start: 33     Change: +5         End: 38

Mellisa and Gurdeep have 33 stones in their bucket. They find 8 more along the beach and collect them. They now have 38 stones in their bucket.

* Pictures could also be drawn to show these stories.

 

 

6/2/17

This week, we are looking at Place Value.

To count to 40 forwards and backwards, beginning with 0 or 1, or from any number.

To count, read and write numbers from 1 - 40 in numerals and words.

 

Strategies to support your child, may include: 

* Use of a number line to understand where a certain number is.

* Separating a number into int's component tend and units and understanding this. For example: 37 is 30 (3 tens) and 7 units (7 ones).   30+7=37

 

Using ten frames 

For example: Use the 10 frames to represent 28

x x x x x
x x x x x
x x x x x
x x x x x
x x x x x
x x x    

Odd one out!

Explain why you think a number is the odd one out. How many different reasons can you find?

10, 15, 25, 36

 

30/1/17

This week, we are still looking at Time.

To recognise and use language relating to dates, including days of the week, weeks, months and years.

To compare, describe and solve practical problems for time [for example, quicker, slower, earlier, later] and measure and begin to record time (hours, minutes, seconds).

 

Sequencing and ordering days of the week, months of the year and talking about familiar events around these dates is beneficial.

Also, problems allowing children to consider the most 'appropriate' times of the week/year would be good to practise. For example:

 

  • Hannah is describing a month. She says, “I don’t like this month because it’s always cold and it’s darker outside for longer. Sometimes it snows.” What month do you think this is?

Convince me!

 

And problems which allow children to consider the passing of time in seconds, minutes, hours, days, weeks, years.

For example:

 

James took 35 seconds to read a page in a book. A class spent 4 minutes looking at a page in a book. Who was the slowest?

 

Mick, Seb and Annie all walk to a football match.

Mick takes 8 minutes to walk there.

Seb is 3 minutes slower than Mick.

Annie is 5 minutes faster than Seb. Who arrives at the football match first? How do you know?

 

Tom and Caroline work at the same place.

Tom cycles to work and takes half an hour, Caroline walks to work and takes one hour.

Think of a way to get there in less time. How long do you think it would take them?

 

 

 

 

 

23/1/17

This week, we are looking at Time. 

To tell the time to the hour and half past the hour and draw the hands on a clock face to show these times. To recognise and use language relating to dates, including days of the week, weeks, months and years. Talking about Seasons linked to relevant months. Beginning to learn know and use terminology like day, week, yesterday, today, tomorrow, weekend, evening, morning, midday, noon, night time, months, seasons, year.

Strategies to include these objectives may be:

Ordering and sequencing days of the week/months of the year.

Talking about a calendar used at home and plotting important events for the month

Playing games with an analogue clock. Eg. 6 o'clock-12 o'clock. Taking turns to either turn clock to next o'clock or half hour. Winner is person who turns to 12 0'clock.

 

 

16/1/17

We are still looking at Addition and Subtraction this week.

We will:

Represent and use number bonds and related subtraction facts within 20.

Add and subtract one digit and two digit numbers to 20, including zero.

Solve one step problems that involve addition and subtraction, using concrete objects and pictorial representations, and missing number

problems such as 7= ? – 9

 

Strategies to support these objectives, include:

 

Complete the number sentence. Use cubes to help you solve the problem. 

5 +8= 9+  _

 

Write a number story to describe the number sentence

 

6 + 8 = 14

 

Here is an example.

 

Jane has 6 balloons. Tom has 8 balloons.

Jane and Tom put their balloons together and have 14 balloons altogether.

 

Can you draw a picture for your number story?

 

Tom has 10 stickers, he gets 7 more.

Can you write a number sentence to show how many stickers Tom has altogether?

 

Together, Sam and Matt have 15 sweets.

Sam has 8 sweets.

How many does Matt have? Write a number sentence to show your working.

Use a ten frame to help you.

X X X X X
X X X X X

 

X X X X X
         

9/1/17

We are looking at Addition and Subtraction this week. 

We will: 

Represent and use number bonds and related subtraction facts within 20.

Add and subtract one digit and two digit numbers to 20, including zero.

Strategies to support these objectives are:

X

X X X X
X X X X X

 

X X X X X
X        

Use 2 ten frames to add numbers crossing 10. eg. 9+7= 16

Model to always start with the larger number and link to counting on from the larger number in your head.

 

Continue the pattern

10 + 5=15

9 + 6 =15

Can you make a similar pattern for

20?

 

 

4/12/16

N/A due to Assessments and Rehearsals.

28/1/16

We are continuing Place Value.

We will : 

Identify and represent numbers using objects and pictorial representations including the number line, and use the language of: equal to, more than, less than (fewer), most, least. 

Count in multiples of twos and fives.

Ways to support this are:

Building set of bricks in pairs/sets of 5 and counting them.

Reasoning: For example, True or False statements... 

•       True or False?

 

I count in fives from 10. 

I say the number 45.

 

Explain your answer. 

Problem Solving: For example,' Jenny has made 2 biscuits. She has 20 jelly tots and 8 chocolate buttons to decorate them. She says ‘I want to use jelly tots in multiples of 5 and chocolate buttons in multiples of 2.’  How many ways could she decorate her biscuits'?  

 

A good method is looking at missing numbers both in a forwards and backwards sequence.

For example, 

•       Find the missing numbers:

 

6

8

 

12

 

16

 

 

30

25

 

 

10

 

 

 

 

 

 

21/11/16

We will continue to cover Place Value this week, as we did not cover all aspects of maths. Therefore, the learning objectives are still the same and the strategies still stand...

13/11/16

We will continue to identify and name basic 2d and 3d shapes and their properties.

We will look at Number/Place Value this week. 

Count to twenty, forwards and backwards, beginning with 0 or 1, from any given number.

Count, read and write numbers from 1 to 20 in numerals and words.

Strategies to help children understand Place Value, include the use of visual cues, such as: number lines, 2x10 squares. (These were given out to the children to bring home as a resource to use at home) and numicon. 

An example using the 2x 10 squares is: 

x x x x x
x x x x x

 

x x x      
         

                                                   10+3= 13

*Children now need to understand to begin to start to count on not from 1, but from 10.

 

6/11/16

We will continue to count across 100 forwards and back, count in 2's, 5's and 10's.

We will continue to look at Geometry/Shape this week. To describe position, direction and movement, including whole, half, quarter and three quarter turns.

A good strategy is to discuss positional language is to explore in children's texts, such as: 'We're Going on a Bear Hunt' by Michael Rosen, 'Rosie's Walk' by Pat Hutchins, 'Naughty Bus' by Janet Oke, and 'Dinosaurs Day Out' by Nick Sherratt.

At this stage, some children find it difficult to grasp the concept of rotation on paper, so physically moving helps children to initially understand turns.

30/10/16

We will continue to count across 100 forwards and back and read and write numbers up to 100.

We will be looking at Geometry/Shape this week. To recognise and name 2d/3d shapes such as: triangle, square, rectangle, circle, pyramid, cuboid, cylinder, pyramid and sphere.

A good strategy is to look at shapes in the environment indoors and outdoors and talk about their shapes and the properties of the shapes. 

Making shape pictures and models and talking about shapes that are similar/different and explaining how they are similar/different.

10/10/16

We will continue to practise counting in 1's, 2,s, 5's and 10's.

We will be: Reading, writing and interpreting mathematical statements involving addition(+), subtraction(-) and equals(=) signs.

 

A good strategy is to use a 10 frame and make addition and subtraction sentences.

* * * * *
* *      

eg: 7+3=10

     10-7=3

(Reasoning)

Missing numbers and the sign needed to make the answer 

eg. 7    *       2       *       9

 

(Problem Solving)

Ben has 9 buns. He eats 2 of them. How many are left?

Can you write a number sentence to show this?

3/10/16

 

We will continue to practise counting in 1's, 2's, 5's and 10's.

We will be: Representing And using number bonds and related subtraction facts (within 10).

We will also be: Adding and subtracting one digit numbers (to 10), including zero.

 

A good strategy to begin adding together 2 numbers is to use x2 10 frames. Children can 'see' and 'touch' the calculation, which brings about greater understanding (more/less, add/take away)

 

 

       

 

 

       

.

 

 

       

 

 

       

 

Combine the numbers to find out how many there are together. Write a number sentence to show your working. (eg. 4+3=7,    7= 3+4,    4 and 3 makes 7)

 

(Reasoning)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

You have 8 cubes

Place the cubes in the 2 squares and write the addition sentence below.

How many pairs can you find?

Are you sure you can't find any more?    

 

(Problem Solving)

1   2  3   4

Pick a pair of numbers. Add them together. How many different totals can you make?

 

 

26/9/16

 

This week, we will continue to count in 1's, 2's, 5's and 10's.

We will be: Identifying and representing numbers using objects and pictorial representations, and use the language of: equal to, more than, less than, less than, most, least.

We will also be: Given a number and identify one more or one less.

 

A good strategy to help achieve fluency is by using 1 or 2 or 3 dice. Adding the numbers together by counting the dots (only applicable if using more than one dice) and asking what is one more/less than the number.  

You can also ask children to find the missing numbers on a partial number line. (Problem-Solving)

For example:       

        13         15     

 

Children could also reason by simple statements.

For example: True or False

1 more than 7 is the same as 1 less than 9. Use the ten frame to show me.

 

 

       

 

 

       

19/9/16

 

This week we will continue to count in 1's, 2's, 5's and 10's.

We will be: Counting, reading and writing numbers to 10 in numerals and words. 

We will also identify and represent numbers using objects and pictorial representations including the number line, and use the language of: equal to, more than, less than, most, least. 

A good strategy ordering numbers from the least to the most is giving children lots of opportunities to practise. eg. Write the numbers from least to most   (This helps their fluency)

71 5 18 19 40

   Children could be scaffolded with a 100 square. You can discuss the following. single digit numbers, lowest sets of tens. If more than one, then lowest units that follow on etc...

(Reasoning)

56 65

                       What's the same about these numbers? What's different?

This heralds a discussion about the same digits, but the place value means different things. Sets of tens and units.

12/9/16

This week, we will be singing counting songs, such as '10 Green Bottles', '5 Little Ducks' and '1,2,3,4,5, Once I caught a Fish Alive'... If you would like to practise these songs at home, there are many versions on You Tube available.

We will be: Counting to 10, forwards and backwards, beginning with 0 or 1, or from any given number. We will also be counting in multiples of 2.

* A good strategy learning the multiples of 2, is to see multiples of 2 in lots of contexts.

Examples include: Counting 2p coins, counting pairs of socks, sequencing flashcards, colouring dot to dots whose numbers are multiples of 2, looking at multiples of 2 on a number line and 100 square.

 

4/9/16

 

We will  be discussing the maths equipment we can self select to help us solve maths problems and looking at ways in which we can use it. 

We will also be looking at having a go at some maths challenges.

We will also be counting orally.

We will also be counting in 2's. 5's and 10's.

 

* A really good strategy when counting is to use your hands to 'Throw the numbers'...

See video footage of the children recorded.

 

Counting in 2's

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Counting in 5's

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Counting in 10's

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Maths Challenges, with Numicon

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